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Immunity. 2015 Nov 17;43(5):998-1010. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2015.09.012. Epub 2015 Oct 27.

The Intestinal Microbiota Contributes to the Ability of Helminths to Modulate Allergic Inflammation.

Author information

1
Global Health Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne 1015, Switzerland.
2
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva 1211, Switzerland.
3
Global Health Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne 1015, Switzerland; Institute of Animal Pathology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern 3012, Switzerland.
4
Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne 1015, Switzerland.
5
Pathogen Genomics Group, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK; Microbiology Group, Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK.
6
Bioinformatics and Biostatistics Core Facility, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne 1015, Switzerland.
7
Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.
8
Maurice Müller Laboratories (DKF), University Hospital of Bern, Bern 3010, Switzerland.
9
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Brisbane, QLD 4032, Australia; Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia.
10
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia.
11
Novartis Pharma AG, Basel 4056, Switzerland.
12
Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne 1011, Switzerland.
13
Global Health Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne 1015, Switzerland. Electronic address: nicola.harris@epfl.ch.

Abstract

Intestinal helminths are potent regulators of their host's immune system and can ameliorate inflammatory diseases such as allergic asthma. In the present study we have assessed whether this anti-inflammatory activity was purely intrinsic to helminths, or whether it also involved crosstalk with the local microbiota. We report that chronic infection with the murine helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb) altered the intestinal habitat, allowing increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. Transfer of the Hpb-modified microbiota alone was sufficient to mediate protection against allergic asthma. The helminth-induced anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion and regulatory T cell suppressor activity that mediated the protection required the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-41. A similar alteration in the metabolic potential of intestinal bacterial communities was observed with diverse parasitic and host species, suggesting that this represents an evolutionary conserved mechanism of host-microbe-helminth interactions.

PMID:
26522986
PMCID:
PMC4658337
DOI:
10.1016/j.immuni.2015.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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