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Sci Rep. 2015 Nov 2;5:15980. doi: 10.1038/srep15980.

Heterogeneity of miR-10b expression in circulating tumor cells.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.
2
Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
3
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation &School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
4
School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
5
National Center for Tumor Diseases, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg Germany.
7
Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW, Australia.
8
Liverpool Clinical School, School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, NSW, Australia.
9
Department of Tumor Biology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
10
St. Vincent's Institute of Medical Research and Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
11
School of Medicine, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients are recognized as important potential targets for future anticancer therapies. As mediators of metastatic spread, CTCs are also promising to be used as 'liquid biopsy' to aid clinical decision-making. Recent work has revealed potentially important genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity within CTC populations, even within the same patient. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and have emerged as potentially important diagnostic markers and targets for anti-cancer therapy. Here, we describe a robust in situ hybridization (ISH) protocol, incorporating the CellSearch(®) CTC detection system, enabling clinical investigation of important miRNAs, such as miR-10b on a cell by cell basis. We also use this method to demonstrate heterogeneity of such as miR-10b on a cell-by-cell basis. We also use this method to demonstrate heterogeneity of miR-10b in individual CTCs from breast, prostate and colorectal cancer patients.

PMID:
26522916
PMCID:
PMC4629160
DOI:
10.1038/srep15980
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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