Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Physiol Behav. 2016 Jan 1;153:133-48. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.10.027. Epub 2015 Oct 30.

Are compression garments effective for the recovery of exercise-induced muscle damage? A systematic review with meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Physical Education and Sport Department, University of Basque Country (UPV-EHU), Vitoria, Spain. Electronic address: dmarques001@ikasle.ehu.eus.
2
Physical Education and Sport Department, University of Basque Country (UPV-EHU), Vitoria, Spain. Electronic address: julio.calleja@ehu.es.
3
Physical Education and Sport Department, University of Basque Country (UPV-EHU), Vitoria, Spain. Electronic address: inaki.arratibel@ehu.eus.
4
Sport and Health Sciences Department, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: adelextrat@brookes.ac.uk.
5
Department of Functional Biology, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; Regional Unit of Sports Medicine of Asturias, Avilés, Spain. Electronic address: nterrados@ayto-aviles.es.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim was to identify benefits of compression garments used for recovery of exercised-induced muscle damage.

METHODS:

Computer-based literature research was performed in September 2015 using four online databases: Medline (PubMed), Cochrane, WOS (Web Of Science) and Scopus. The analysis of risk of bias was completed in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines. Mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with Hedges' g for continuous outcomes. A random effect meta-analysis model was used. Systematic differences (heterogeneity) were assessed with I(2) statistic.

RESULTS:

Most results obtained had high heterogeneity, thus their interpretation should be careful. Our findings showed that creatine kinase (standard mean difference=-0.02, 9 studies) was unaffected when using compression garments for recovery purposes. In contrast, blood lactate concentration was increased (standard mean difference=0.98, 5 studies). Applying compression reduced lactate dehydrogenase (standard mean difference=-0.52, 2 studies), muscle swelling (standard mean difference=-0.73, 5 studies) and perceptual measurements (standard mean difference=-0.43, 15 studies). Analyses of power (standard mean difference=1.63, 5 studies) and strength (standard mean difference=1.18, 8 studies) indicate faster recovery of muscle function after exercise.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that the application of compression clothing may aid in the recovery of exercise induced muscle damage, although the findings need corroboration.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Metabolism; Metabolites; Muscle function; Venous hemodynamic

PMID:
26522739
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.10.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center