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J Pediatr. 2016 Jan;168:185-92.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.09.066. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Eczema Is Associated with Childhood Speech Disorder: A Retrospective Analysis from the National Survey of Children's Health and the National Health Interview Survey.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.
2
Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Department of Preventive Medicine and Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary Eczema Center, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: JonathanISilverberg@Gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if eczema is associated with an increased risk of a speech disorder.

STUDY DESIGN:

We analyzed data on 354,416 children and adolescents from 19 US population-based cohorts: the 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health and 1997-2013 National Health Interview Survey, each prospective, questionnaire-based cohorts.

RESULTS:

In multivariate survey logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographics and comorbid allergic disease, eczema was significantly associated with higher odds of speech disorder in 12 of 19 cohorts (P < .05). The pooled prevalence of speech disorder in children with eczema was 4.7% (95% CI 4.5%-5.0%) compared with 2.2% (95% CI 2.2%-2.3%) in children without eczema. In pooled multivariate analysis, eczema was associated with increased odds of speech disorder (aOR [95% CI] 1.81 [1.57-2.05], P < .001). In a single study assessing eczema severity, mild (1.36 [1.02-1.81], P = .03) and severe eczema (3.56 [1.70-7.48], P < .001) were associated with higher odds of speech disorder. History of eczema was associated with moderate (2.35 [1.34-4.10], P = .003) and severe (2.28 [1.11-4.72], P = .03) speech disorder. Finally, significant interactions were found, such that children with both eczema and attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity or sleep disturbance had vastly increased risk of speech disorders than either by itself.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric eczema may be associated with increased risk of speech disorder. Further, prospective studies are needed to characterize the exact nature of this association.

PMID:
26520915
PMCID:
PMC5216176
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.09.066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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