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J Colloid Interface Sci. 2016 Feb 1;463:145-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2015.10.055. Epub 2015 Oct 24.

Novel Bi2MoO6/TiO2 heterostructure microspheres for degradation of benzene series compound under visible light irradiation.

Author information

1
Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics & Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China.
2
Institute of Coordination Bond Metrology and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018, China. Electronic address: lxj669635@126.com.
3
Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics & Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China. Electronic address: lkpan@phy.ecnu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Novel Bi2MoO6/TiO2 heterostructure microspheres were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method. Their morphology, structure and photocatalytic performance in the degradation of phenol and nitrobenzene were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectra, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and total organic carbon analyser, respectively. The results show that the Bi2MoO6/TiO2 heterostructures exhibit excellent photocatalytic performance with maximum phenol and nitrobenzene degradation rates of 96% and 94% and corresponding mineralization rates of 66% and 61% in 300min under visible light irradiation, respectively. The improved photocatalytic performance is mainly ascribed to the reduced electron-hole pair recombination with the introduction of TiO2.

KEYWORDS:

Bi(2)MoO(6)/TiO(2); Heterostructure; Nitrobenzene; Phenol; Photocatalysis

PMID:
26520821
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcis.2015.10.055

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