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J Chem Neuroanat. 2016 Sep;75(Pt B):134-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jchemneu.2015.10.005. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Oxidative stress of brain and liver is increased by Wi-Fi (2.45GHz) exposure of rats during pregnancy and the development of newborns.

Author information

1
Neuroscience Research Center, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey; Department of Biophysics, Medicine Faculty, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey. Electronic address: Omercelik.vm@gmail.com.
2
Department of Biophysics, Medicine Faculty, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Izmir, Turkey.
3
Neuroscience Research Center, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey; Department of Biophysics, Medicine Faculty, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey. Electronic address: mustafanaziroglu@sdu.edu.tr.

Abstract

An excessive production of reactive oxygen substances (ROS) and reduced antioxidant defence systems resulting from electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure may lead to oxidative brain and liver damage and degradation of membranes during pregnancy and development of rat pups. We aimed to investigate the effects of Wi-Fi-induced EMR on the brain and liver antioxidant redox systems in the rat during pregnancy and development. Sixteen pregnant rats and their 48 newborns were equally divided into control and EMR groups. The EMR groups were exposed to 2.45GHz EMR (1h/day for 5 days/week) from pregnancy to 3 weeks of age. Brain cortex and liver samples were taken from the newborns between the first and third weeks. In the EMR groups, lipid peroxidation levels in the brain and liver were increased following EMR exposure; however, the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and vitamin A, vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations were decreased in the brain and liver. Glutathione (GSH) and vitamin C concentrations in the brain were also lower in the EMR groups than in the controls; however, their concentrations did not change in the liver. In conclusion, Wi-Fi-induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver of developing rats was the result of reduced GSH-Px, GSH and antioxidant vitamin concentrations. Moreover, the brain seemed to be more sensitive to oxidative injury compared to the liver in the development of newborns.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidant vitamins; Brain; Electromagnetic radiation; Glutathione; Liver; Oxidative stress

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