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Trends Parasitol. 2016 Mar;32(3):242-254. doi: 10.1016/j.pt.2015.10.002. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Sialomes and Mialomes: A Systems-Biology View of Tick Tissues and Tick-Host Interactions.

Author information

1
Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice, Budweis, Czech Republic; Department of Clinical Pathobiochemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
2
Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice, Budweis, Czech Republic; Institute of Parasitology, Biology Center, Czech Academy of Sciences, Budweis, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, USA.
4
Institute of Parasitology, Biology Center, Czech Academy of Sciences, Budweis, Czech Republic.
5
Section of Vector Biology, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA.
6
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
7
Institute of Parasitology, Biology Center, Czech Academy of Sciences, Budweis, Czech Republic. Electronic address: mich_kotsyfakis@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Tick saliva facilitates tick feeding and infection of the host. Gene expression analysis of tick salivary glands and other tissues involved in host-pathogen interactions has revealed a wide range of bioactive tick proteins. Transcriptomic analysis has been a milestone in the field and has recently been enhanced by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Furthermore, the application of quantitative proteomics to ticks with unknown genomes has provided deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tick hematophagy, pathogen transmission, and tick-host-pathogen interactions. We review current knowledge on the transcriptomics and proteomics of tick tissues from a systems-biology perspective and discuss future challenges in the field.

KEYWORDS:

next-generation sequencing; sialomes; systems biology; tick-borne pathogens

PMID:
26520005
PMCID:
PMC4767689
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.pt.2015.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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