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Acta Trop. 2017 Jan;165:274-279. doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2015.10.014. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Global partnerships are critical to advance the control of Neglected Zoonotic Diseases: The case of the Global Alliance for Rabies Control.

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1
Global Alliance for Rabies Control, 529 Humboldt Street, Suite 1, Manhattan, Kansas 66502, USA; Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa.
2
Global Alliance for Rabies Control, 529 Humboldt Street, Suite 1, Manhattan, Kansas 66502, USA; Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute for Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Louise.Taylor@rabiesalliance.org.
3
Global Alliance for Rabies Control, 529 Humboldt Street, Suite 1, Manhattan, Kansas 66502, USA.

Abstract

There is a need for innovation to improve control of all Neglected Zoonotic Diseases (NZDs). The Global Alliance for Rabies Control was formed to prevent human deaths from rabies and relieve the burden of rabies in other animal populations, especially dogs. It aims to identify reasons for the neglect of rabies in developing countries and to develop strategies to improve rabies control. Through initiatives such as World Rabies Day and the Partners for Rabies Prevention, progress has been made towards increased awareness of the burden of rabies transmitted by dogs at scales from local to international. An evidence base of the feasibility of canine rabies elimination has been built up and now easier access to information and tools enables countries to design and implement rabies elimination strategies in a logical way, utilizing the structures of regional networks for rabies control. The body of evidence has built consensus amongst international stakeholders in rabies control and is now being used to encourage international policy change, attract investment and increase delivery of effective rabies control programmes in canine rabies endemic countries.

KEYWORDS:

Health policy; Neglected Zoonotic Disease; Rabies; Rabies control

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