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J Crohns Colitis. 2016 Mar;10(3):255-61. doi: 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv202. Epub 2015 Oct 29.

Temporal Change in Phenotypic Behaviour in Patients with Crohn's Disease: Do Indian Patients Behave Differently from Western and Other Asian Patients?

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, P D Hinduja Hospital, Mumbai, India.
2
Division of GI Surgery, P D Hinduja Hospital, Mumbai, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

In Western studies, one-third of patients with Crohn's disease have stricturing or penetrating disease at presentation and one-half will progress to complicated disease in 20 years. Asian studies indicate that the Asian disease phenotype may be different. Our aim was to study the disease behaviour in Indian patients with Crohn's disease.

METHODS:

In this hospital-based study, we analysed [Montreal classification] disease phenotype, presence of perianal disease, need for intestinal surgery, and changes in the Montreal classification over time in Crohn's disease patients from our database.

RESULTS:

In the 178 patients (median age 35, interquartile range [IQR] 21 years; 97 males) with Crohn's disease, the proportion of various features was as follows. More patients had ileo-colonic[L3: 43.8%] than ileal[L1: 27.5%] or colonic[L2: 28.7%] disease. Perianal disease was seen in 11.8% at baseline. Non-stricturing, non-fistulising disease[B1] was seen in 74.7%, 65.7%, 50%, and 44.4% at baseline, at 5, 10 and 15 years, respectively. Stricturing disease[B2] was seen in 21.4%, 21.9%, 28.9%, and 33.3%; penetrating disease[B3] in 3.9%, 11.4%, 21%, and 16.7%; and intestinal surgery was required in 10.7%, 20%, 34.2%, and 55.5%, respectively. KaplanMeier analysis showed no association between progression of disease and patient age or the location of the disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gender distribution and predominant ileo-colonic location of disease were similar to earlier Asian reports on Crohn's disease. Perianal disease was less frequent than reported in Western and other Asian studies. One-fourth of Indian patients had aggressive disease at diagnosis, but the tendency to progress towards aggressive disease over time was less pronounced than in Western patients.

KEYWORDS:

Crohn’s disease; India; Montreal classification; natural history

PMID:
26519461
PMCID:
PMC4957468
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv202
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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