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Surv Ophthalmol. 2016 Jul-Aug;61(4):422-33. doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2015.10.003. Epub 2015 Oct 27.

Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: roland.smith@nyumc.org.

Abstract

Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration.

KEYWORDS:

age-related macular degeneration; age-related maculopathy; cardiovascular disease; coronary artery disease; reticular drusen; reticular macular disease; reticular pseudodrusen; subretinal drusenoid deposits

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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