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Eur J Neurol. 2016 Feb;23(2):327-32. doi: 10.1111/ene.12844. Epub 2015 Oct 31.

Vitamin D in clinically isolated syndrome: evidence for possible neuroprotection.

Author information

1
Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
2
Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Immune Tolerance Network, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Vitamin D status has been associated with inflammatory activity in multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is not known if it is associated with gray matter volume, the loss of which predicts long-term disability in MS. The association of vitamin D levels with brain volume measures and inflammatory activity in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) was investigated.

METHODS:

In the phase 2 CIS trial of atorvastatin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were evaluated for their age-adjusted associations with normalized gray matter and brain parenchymal volumes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The relationships between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and clinical and MRI measures of inflammatory activity were also assessed.

RESULTS:

In 65 patients in this substudy, each 25 nmol/l higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was associated with 7.8 ml higher gray matter volume (95% confidence interval 1.0, 14.6, P = 0.025). There was a tendency for an inverse association of average 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and the composite end-point of ≥3 new brain T2 lesions or ≥1 relapse within a year (odds ratio per 25 nmol/l higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D level 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.41, 1.08, P = 0.096).

CONCLUSIONS:

Vitamin D status may impact neurodegeneration after CIS, although these results should be replicated in a second study. If confirmed in clinical trials, vitamin D supplementation may reduce long-term disability.

KEYWORDS:

demyelinating disease; epidemiology; magnetic resonance imaging; multiple sclerosis; neurodegenerative disorders

PMID:
26518224
DOI:
10.1111/ene.12844
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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