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Matern Child Health J. 2016 Mar;20(3):665-73. doi: 10.1007/s10995-015-1866-z.

Shared Decision Making in the Care of Children with Developmental and Behavioral Disorders.

Author information

1
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Center for Innovation in Chronic Disease Care, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, MLC 7027, Cincinnati, OH, 45229, USA. ellen.lipstein@cchmc.org.
2
James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, USA. ellen.lipstein@cchmc.org.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, USA. ellen.lipstein@cchmc.org.
4
College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, 401 Waldo Hall, Corvallis, OR, USA. olindly@gmail.com.
5
James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, USA. julia.anixt@cchmc.org.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, USA. julia.anixt@cchmc.org.
7
Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, USA. julia.anixt@cchmc.org.
8
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Center for Innovation in Chronic Disease Care, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, MLC 7027, Cincinnati, OH, 45229, USA. maria.britto@cchmc.org.
9
James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, USA. maria.britto@cchmc.org.
10
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, USA. maria.britto@cchmc.org.
11
Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, 700 S.W. Campus Drive, Portland, OR, USA. zuckerma@ohsu.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Shared decision making (SDM) is most needed when there are multiple treatment options and no "right" choice. As with quality and experience of care, frequency of SDM may vary by health condition. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare parent report of SDM between a physical and a behavioral health condition and; (2) to compare parent report of SDM between two different behavioral health conditions.

METHODS:

Data on children age 3-17 years with asthma, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were drawn from the 2009/10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Weighted logistic regression was used to compare a parent-reported, composite measure of SDM. Analyses controlled for sociodemographic factors that may influence experience of SDM.

RESULTS:

Compared to parents of children with asthma, parents of children with ADHD were significantly less likely to report experiencing consistent SDM (AOR 0.73). Compared to parents of children with ADHD, those of children with ASD had significantly lower odds of experiencing consistent SDM (AOR 0.59). Those with both ADHD and ASD had the same odds as those with ASD alone of experiencing consistent SDM.

CONCLUSION:

Use of SDM is particularly limited in developmental and behavioral conditions, such as ADHD and ASD. These data suggest that challenges to implementing SDM may include disease type, complexity, and use of specialty care. Research to identify specific barriers and facilitators of SDM is needed to inform interventions that will promote SDM in developmental and behavioral conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; Autism; Chronic conditions; Shared decision making

PMID:
26518006
PMCID:
PMC4754131
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10995-015-1866-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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