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Brain Behav. 2015 Sep 23;5(10):e00374. doi: 10.1002/brb3.374. eCollection 2015.

Practice changes beta power at rest and its modulation during movement in healthy subjects but not in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience CUNY Medical School New York New York 10031.
  • 2Department of Biomedical Engineering CCNY New York New York 10031.
  • 3Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience CUNY Medical School New York New York 10031 ; Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatry and Anaesthesiological Sciences University of Messina Messina 98125 Italy ; The Fresco Institute for Parkinson's and Movement Disorders NYU-Langone School of Medicine New York New York 10016.
  • 4The Fresco Institute for Parkinson's and Movement Disorders NYU-Langone School of Medicine New York New York 10016.
  • 5Department of Psychiatry University of Madison Madison Wisconsin 53719.
  • 6Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience CUNY Medical School New York New York 10031 ; The Fresco Institute for Parkinson's and Movement Disorders NYU-Langone School of Medicine New York New York 10016.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

PD (Parkinson's disease) is characterized by impairments in cortical plasticity, in beta frequency at rest and in beta power modulation during movement (i.e., event-related ERS [synchronization] and ERD [desynchronization]). Recent results with experimental protocols inducing long-term potentiation in healthy subjects suggest that cortical plasticity phenomena might be reflected by changes of beta power recorded with EEG during rest. Here, we determined whether motor practice produces changes in beta power at rest and during movements in both healthy subjects and patients with PD. We hypothesized that such changes would be reduced in PD.

METHODS:

We thus recorded EEG in patients with PD and age-matched controls before, during and after a 40-minute reaching task. We determined posttask changes of beta power at rest and assessed the progressive changes of beta ERD and ERS during the task over frontal and sensorimotor regions.

RESULTS:

We found that beta ERS and ERD changed significantly with practice in controls but not in PD. In PD compared to controls, beta power at rest was greater over frontal sensors but posttask changes, like those during movements, were far less evident. In both groups, kinematic characteristics improved with practice; however, there was no correlation between such improvements and the changes in beta power.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that prolonged practice in a motor task produces use-dependent modifications that are reflected in changes of beta power at rest and during movement. In PD, such changes are significantly reduced; such a reduction might represent, at least partially, impairment of cortical plasticity.

KEYWORDS:

Event‐related desynchronization; RRID:nif‐0000‐00076; RRID:nlx_143928; RRID:nlx_155825; RRID:rid_000042; event‐related synchronization; kinematics; motor task; plasticity

PMID:
26516609
PMCID:
PMC4614055
DOI:
10.1002/brb3.374
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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