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Nat Commun. 2015 Oct 30;6:8727. doi: 10.1038/ncomms9727.

Gut mucosal microbiome across stages of colorectal carcinogenesis.

Nakatsu G1,2, Li X1,2, Zhou H3, Sheng J4, Wong SH1,2, Wu WK1,2,5, Ng SC1,2, Tsoi H1,2, Dong Y1,2, Zhang N6, He Y4, Kang Q4, Cao L1,2, Wang K1,2, Zhang J1,2, Liang Q1,2, Yu J1,2, Sung JJ1,2.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Institute of Digestive Disease, State Key Laboratory of Digestive Disease, Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR, China.
2
CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute, 2 Yuexing Road, Nanshan District, Shenzhen 518057, China.
3
Department of Microbiology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR, China.
4
Department of Gastroenterology, Beijing Military General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Haidian, Beijing 100853, China.
5
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR, China.
6
Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Second Road, Yuexiu, Guangzhou 510080, China.

Abstract

Gut microbial dysbiosis contributes to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we catalogue the microbial communities in human gut mucosae at different stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. We analyse the gut mucosal microbiome of 47 paired samples of adenoma and adenoma-adjacent mucosae, 52 paired samples of carcinoma and carcinoma-adjacent mucosae and 61 healthy controls. Probabilistic partitioning of relative abundance profiles reveals that a metacommunity predominated by members of the oral microbiome is primarily associated with CRC. Analysis of paired samples shows differences in community configurations between lesions and the adjacent mucosae. Correlations of bacterial taxa indicate early signs of dysbiosis in adenoma, and co-exclusive relationships are subsequently more common in cancer. We validate these alterations in CRC-associated microbiome by comparison with two previously published data sets. Our results suggest that a taxonomically defined microbial consortium is implicated in the development of CRC.

PMID:
26515465
PMCID:
PMC4640069
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms9727
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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