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World Neurosurg. 2016 Apr;88:548-51. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2015.10.041. Epub 2015 Oct 26.

Intraoperative Hemorrhage in Ventriculoscopic Surgery: Experience of a Single Chinese Neurosurgery Center.

Author information

1
Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders Brain Tumor Center, Beijing, China; China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
3
Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders Brain Tumor Center, Beijing, China; China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Beijing, China. Electronic address: zyz2004520@yeah.net.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ventriculoscopic approach has been considered to be more safe and effective in the treatment of hydrocephalus, arachnoid cysts and intraventricular lesions in neurosurgery. We found that intraoperative bleeding-related complications have the greatest impact on ventriculoscopic surgery. Until now, few studies fully discussed this complication.

METHODS:

Patients who underwent ventriculoscopic surgery between May 2011 and December 2012 at Beijing Tiantan Hospital were analyzed.

RESULTS:

A total of 126 patients were enrolled in the study. Intraoperative hemorrhage was observed in 75 cases (59.5%). Intraoperative hemorrhage classification of patients was as follows: stage I (n = 62); stage II (n = 11); stage III (n = 2). We found that there was no significant difference in complication rate and rate of symptom improvement between the patients who had hemorrhage and the patients who did not (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Intraoperative hemorrhage in ventriculoscopic surgery should be paid more attention. Generally, a skilled neurosurgeon can address hemorrhage with a low complication rate. Consequently, the ventriculoscopic approach is safe and effective in the treatment of specified brain ventricular disease.

KEYWORDS:

Hemorrhage; Neurosurgery; Ventriculoscopy

PMID:
26514635
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2015.10.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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