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J Exp Child Psychol. 2016 Feb;142:96-106. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2015.09.016. Epub 2015 Oct 26.

I won't tell: Young children show loyalty to their group by keeping group secrets.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: antonia.misch@yale.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK.
3
School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland, UK; Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Abstract

Group loyalty is highly valued. However, little is known about young children's loyal behavior. This study tested whether 4- and 5-year-olds (N=96) remain loyal to their group even when betraying it would be materially advantageous. Children and four puppets were allocated to novel groups. Two of these puppets (either in-group or out-group members) then told children a group secret and urged them not to disclose the secret. Another puppet (not assigned to either group) then bribed children with stickers to tell the secret. Across ages, children were significantly less likely to reveal the secret in the in-group condition than in the out-group condition. Thus, even young children are willing to pay a cost to be loyal to their group.

KEYWORDS:

Commitment; Group membership; Group norms; Loyalty; Minimal group paradigm; Secrecy

PMID:
26513328
DOI:
10.1016/j.jecp.2015.09.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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