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Pediatr Int. 2015 Oct;57(5):1044-7. doi: 10.1111/ped.12818.

Relieving pain and distress during venipuncture: Pilot study of the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS).

Author information

1
Medical Support Center for Japan Environment and Children's Study, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Health and Psychosocial Medicine, School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Aichi, Japan.
3
Department of General Pediatrics, Miyagi Children's Hospital, Miyagi, Japan.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
5
Research Center for Environment and Developmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
6
South Kyushu and Okinawa Regional Center for the Japan Environment and Children's Study, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
7
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fukuoka, Japan.
8
Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fukuoka, Japan.
9
Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan.
10
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan.
11
National Center for the Japan Environment and Children's Study, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Ibaraki, Japan.

Abstract

Pain management for needle-related procedures is poor in Japan. In many countries the use of lidocaine/prilocaine cream for the relief of pain associated with venipuncture has been approved. In children, a psychological approach has also been shown to be effective in reducing pain with venipuncture. We developed a multidisciplinary procedure that combines a cream (2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine) and pharmacological approaches such as preparation, education, positioning and distraction. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of the procedure for young children. Among 132 pediatric participants, 58.3% did not cry during venipuncture. According to caregiver questionnaire, 71.9% felt that the multidisciplinary procedure eliminated the fear of needle-related procedures in the children; 90.9% were satisfied with it and 75.8% thought it should be applied to all children undergoing venipuncture. The present results suggest that the multidisciplinary procedure is feasible, acceptable and suitable for use in children undergoing venipuncture.

KEYWORDS:

distress; lidocaine/prilocaine cream; pain; psychological intervention in venipuncture

PMID:
26508194
DOI:
10.1111/ped.12818
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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