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Nutrients. 2015 Oct 21;7(10):8685-99. doi: 10.3390/nu7105420.

Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

Author information

1
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. cameron.mitchell@auckland.ac.nz.
2
School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. robinmcgregor@gmail.com.
3
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Center, College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan 614-735, Korea. robinmcgregor@gmail.com.
4
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. r.dsouza@auckland.ac.nz.
5
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. e.thorstensen@auckland.ac.nz.
6
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. j.markworth@auckland.ac.nz.
7
Fonterra Research and Development Centre, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand. Aaron.Fanning@fonterra.com.
8
School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. s.poppitt@auckland.ac.nz.
9
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. d.cameron-smith@auckland.ac.nz.

Abstract

The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

KEYWORDS:

amino acids; fractional synthetic rate; milk protein; muscle; stable isotopes; whey protein

PMID:
26506377
PMCID:
PMC4632440
DOI:
10.3390/nu7105420
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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