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Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2016 Feb;19(2):127-33. doi: 10.1089/cyber.2015.0229. Epub 2015 Oct 27.

Virtual Reality Body Swapping: A Tool for Modifying the Allocentric Memory of the Body.

Author information

1
1 Applied Technology for Neuro-Psychology Lab, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano , Milan, Italy .
2
2 Department of Experimental Psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Utrecht University , Utrecht, Netherlands .
3
3 Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart , Milan, Italy .
4
4 Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia , Pavia, Italy .
5
5 Department of Surgery and Interdisciplinary Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca , Milan, Italy .
6
6 Centre for Studies in Communication Sciences-CESCOM, University of Milano-Bicocca , Milan, Italy .

Abstract

An increasing amount of evidence has shown that embodiment of a virtual body via visuo-tactile stimulation can lead to an altered perception of body and object size. The current study aimed to investigate whether virtual reality (VR) body swapping can be an effective tool for modifying the enduring memory of the body. The experimental sample included 21 female participants who were asked to estimate the width and circumference of different body parts before any kind of stimulation and after two types of body swapping illusions ("synchronous visuo-tactile stimulation" and "asynchronous visuo-tactile stimulation"). Findings revealed that after participants embodied a virtual body with a skinny belly (independently of the type of visuo-tactile stimulation), there was an update of the stored representation of the body: participants reported a decrease in the ratio between estimated and actual body measures for most of the body parts considered. Based on the Allocentric Lock Theory, these findings provide first evidence that VR body swapping is able to induce a change in the memory of the body. This knowledge may be potentially useful for patients suffering from eating and weight disorders.

PMID:
26506136
DOI:
10.1089/cyber.2015.0229
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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