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Allergy. 2016 Apr;71(4):433-42. doi: 10.1111/all.12800. Epub 2016 Jan 19.

Asthma and dietary intake: an overview of systematic reviews.

Author information

1
Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine, and Public Health Group, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK.
2
Department of Medical Sciences 'M Aresu', University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
3
Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto and Hospital São João, Porto, Portugal.
4
CINTESIS - Center for Health Technology and Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Lung Function Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
6
Central Library, Imperial College London, London, UK.
7
Department of Medicine and Allergology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
8
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
9
Second University of Naples and IFT-CNR, Rome, Italy.
10
Transylvania University Brasov, Brasov, Romania.
11
Centre for Paediatrics and Child Health, Institute of Human Development, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Abstract

Epidemiological research on the relationship between diet and asthma has increased in the last decade. Several components found in foods have been proposed to have a series of antioxidant, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties, which can have a protective effect against asthma risk. Several literature reviews and critical appraisals have been published to summarize the existing evidence in this field. In the context of this EAACI Lifestyle and asthma Task Force, we summarize the evidence from existing systematic reviews on dietary intake and asthma, using the PRISMA guidelines. We therefore report the quality of eligible systematic reviews and summarize the results of those with an AMSTAR score ≥32. The GRADE approach is used to assess the overall quality of the existing evidence. This overview is centred on systematic reviews of nutritional components provided in the diet only, as a way to establish what type of advice can be given in clinical practice and to the general population on dietary habits and asthma.

KEYWORDS:

asthma; diet; food intake; systematic review; wheeze

PMID:
26505989
DOI:
10.1111/all.12800
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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