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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Nov;63(11):2332-9. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13794. Epub 2015 Oct 27.

Midlife and Late-Life Smoking and Risk of Dementia in the Community: The Hisayama Study.

Author information

1
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
2
Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
3
Department of Center for Cohort Studies, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
4
Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
5
Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To clarify the association between midlife and late-life smoking and risk of dementia.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

The Hisayama Study, Japan.

PARTICIPANTS:

Japanese community-dwellers without dementia aged 65 to 84 (mean age 72) followed for 17 years (1988-2005) (N = 754), 619 of whom had participated in a health examination conducted in 1973-74 (mean age, 57) and were included in the midlife analysis.

MEASUREMENTS:

The risk estimates of smoking status on the development of dementia were computed using a Cox proportional hazards model.

RESULTS:

During follow-up, 252 subjects developed all-cause dementia; 143 had Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 76 had vascular dementia (VaD). In late life, the multivariable-adjusted risk of all-cause dementia was significantly greater in current smokers than in never smokers; similar associations were seen for all-cause dementia, AD, and VaD in midlife current smokers. Meanwhile, no significant association was observed between past smoking and risk of any type of dementia in late or midlife. Multivariable analysis showed that smokers in midlife and late life had significantly greater risks than lifelong nonsmokers of all-cause dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 2.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.49-3.49), AD (aHR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.09-3.61), and VaD (aHR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.34-6.20). Such associations were not observed for midlife smokers who quit smoking in late life.

CONCLUSION:

Persistent smoking from mid- to late life is a significant risk factor for dementia and its subtypes in the general Japanese population.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; cohort studies; dementia; smoking; vascular dementia

PMID:
26503243
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.13794
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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