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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;72(12):1235-42. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.1858.

Prevalence of Marijuana Use Disorders in the United States Between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York2Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York3New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York.
2
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Laws and attitudes toward marijuana in the United States are becoming more permissive but little is known about whether the prevalence rates of marijuana use and marijuana use disorders have changed in the 21st century.

OBJECTIVE:

To present nationally representative information on the past-year prevalence rates of marijuana use, marijuana use disorder, and marijuana use disorder among marijuana users in the US adult general population and whether this has changed between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Face-to-face interviews conducted in surveys of 2 nationally representative samples of US adults: the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (data collected April 2001-April 2002; N = 43,093) and the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (data collected April 2012-June 2013; N = 36,309). Data were analyzed March through May 2015.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

Past-year marijuana use and DSM-IV marijuana use disorder (abuse or dependence).

RESULTS:

The past-year prevalence of marijuana use was 4.1% (SE, 0.15) in 2001-2002 and 9.5% (SE, 0.27) in 2012-2013, a significant increase (P < .05). Significant increases were also found across demographic subgroups (sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, income, urban/rural, and region). The past-year prevalence of DSM-IV marijuana use disorder was 1.5% (0.08) in 2001-2002 and 2.9% (SE, 0.13) in 2012-2013 (P < .05). With few exceptions, increases in the prevalence of marijuana use disorder between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013 were also statistically significant (P < .05) across demographic subgroups. However, the prevalence of marijuana use disorder among marijuana users decreased significantly from 2001-2002 (35.6%; SE, 1.37) to 2012-2013 (30.6%; SE, 1.04).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

The prevalence of marijuana use more than doubled between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013, and there was a large increase in marijuana use disorders during that time. While not all marijuana users experience problems, nearly 3 of 10 marijuana users manifested a marijuana use disorder in 2012-2013. Because the risk for marijuana use disorder did not increase among users, the increase in prevalence of marijuana use disorder is owing to an increase in prevalence of users in the US adult population. Given changing laws and attitudes toward marijuana, a balanced presentation of the likelihood of adverse consequences of marijuana use to policy makers, professionals, and the public is needed.

PMID:
26502112
PMCID:
PMC5037576
DOI:
10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.1858
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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