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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Oct 15;12(10):12924-40. doi: 10.3390/ijerph121012924.

Association of Exposure to particular matter and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. lxlryyc@sina.com.
2
Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. lianhui1988@163.com.
3
Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. yanping.ruan@163.com.
4
Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. 18911122174@163.com.
5
Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. zhaoxy0909@sina.com.
6
Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular & Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. medmnr@leeds.ac.uk.
7
Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. Fan@pumch.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Long time exposure to particular matter has been linked to myocardial infarction, stroke and blood pressure, but its association with atherosclerosis is not clear. This meta-analysis was aimed at assessing whether PM₂.₅ and PM₁₀ have an effect on subclinical atherosclerosis measured by carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT).

METHODS:

Pubmed, Ovid Medline, Embase and NICK between 1948 and 31 March 2015 were searched by combining the keywords about exposure to the outcome related words. The random-effects model was applied in computing the change of CIMT and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The effect of potential confounding factors was assessed by stratified analysis and the impact of traffic proximity was also estimated.

RESULTS:

Among 56 identified studies, 11 articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. In overall analysis increments of 10 μg/m³ in PM₂.₅ and PM₁₀ were associated with an increase of CIMT (16.79 μm; 95% CI, 4.95-28.63 μm and 4.13 μm; 95% CI, -5.79-14.04 μm, respectively). RESULTS shown in subgroup analysis had reference value for comparing with those of the overall analysis. The impact of traffic proximity on CIMT was uncertain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Exposure to PM₂.₅ had a significant association with CIMT and for women the effect may be more obvious.

KEYWORDS:

PM10; PM2.5; air pollution; carotid intima-media thickness; meta-analysis; subclinical atherosclerosis

PMID:
26501300
PMCID:
PMC4627008
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph121012924
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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