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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016 Mar;1862(3):442-51. doi: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2015.10.014. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Neuroscience Graduate Program, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Neuroscience Graduate Program, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. Electronic address: iliffj@ohsu.edu.

Abstract

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation and turnover provides a sink for the elimination of solutes from the brain interstitium, serving an important homeostatic role for the function of the central nervous system. Disruption of normal CSF circulation and turnover is believed to contribute to the development of many diseases, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Recent insights into CSF biology suggesting that CSF and interstitial fluid exchange along a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces termed the 'glymphatic' system suggest that CSF circulation may interact intimately with glial and vascular function to regulate basic aspects of brain function. Dysfunction within this glial vascular network, which is a feature of the aging and injured brain, is a potentially critical link between brain injury, neuroinflammation and the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Ongoing research within this field may provide a powerful new framework for understanding the common links between neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease, in addition to providing potentially novel therapeutic targets for these conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; CSF; Cerebral ischemia; Diurnal variation; Glymphatic; Multiple sclerosis

PMID:
26499397
PMCID:
PMC4755861
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbadis.2015.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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