Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biotechnol Bioeng. 2016 Jun;113(6):1155-63. doi: 10.1002/bit.25869. Epub 2015 Nov 10.

Scaffold and scaffold-free self-assembled systems in regenerative medicine.

Author information

1
Centre for Research in Medical Devices (CÚRAM), Biosciences Research Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland.
2
Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI), Biosciences Research Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland.
3
Regenerative, Modular & Developmental Engineering Laboratory (REMODEL), Biosciences Research Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland.
4
Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ashtown, Ireland.
5
Centre for Research in Medical Devices (CÚRAM), Biosciences Research Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland. dimitrios.zeugolis@nuiglaway.ie.
6
Regenerative, Modular & Developmental Engineering Laboratory (REMODEL), Biosciences Research Building, National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway), Galway, Ireland. dimitrios.zeugolis@nuiglaway.ie.

Abstract

Self-assembly in tissue engineering refers to the spontaneous chemical or biological association of components to form a distinct functional construct, reminiscent of native tissue. Such self-assembled systems have been widely used to develop platforms for the delivery of therapeutic and/or bioactive molecules and various cell populations. Tissue morphology and functional characteristics have been recapitulated in several self-assembled constructs, designed to incorporate stimuli responsiveness and controlled architecture through spatial confinement or field manipulation. In parallel, owing to substantial functional properties, scaffold-free cell-assembled devices have aided in the development of functional neotissues for various clinical targets. Herein, we discuss recent advancements and future aspirations in scaffold and scaffold-free self-assembled devices for regenerative medicine purposes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1155-1163.

KEYWORDS:

cell-assembled devices; delivery of biologics; modular engineering; self-assembly; stimuli-responsive polymers; tissue engineering

PMID:
26498484
DOI:
10.1002/bit.25869
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center