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Mol Pain. 2015 Oct 24;11:65. doi: 10.1186/s12990-015-0068-4.

Contribution of Piezo2 to endothelium-dependent pain.

Author information

1
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0440, USA. Luiz.Ferrari@ucsf.edu.
2
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0440, USA. Oliver.Bogen@ucsf.edu.
3
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0440, USA. Paul.Green@ucsf.edu.
4
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0440, USA. jon.levine@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We evaluated the role of a mechanically-gated ion channel, Piezo2, in mechanical stimulation-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia produced by the pronociceptive vasoactive mediator endothelin-1, an innocuous mechanical stimulus-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia that is vascular endothelial cell dependent. We also evaluated its role in a preclinical model of a vascular endothelial cell dependent painful peripheral neuropathy.

RESULTS:

The local administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to Piezo2 mRNA, at the site of nociceptive testing in the rat's hind paw, but not intrathecally at the central terminal of the nociceptor, prevented innocuous stimulus-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia produced by endothelin-1 (100 ng). The mechanical hyperalgesia induced by oxaliplatin (2 mg/kg. i.v.), which was inhibited by impairing endothelial cell function, was similarly attenuated by local injection of the Piezo2 antisense. Polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated for the first time the presence of Piezo2 mRNA in endothelial cells.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results support the hypothesis that Piezo2 is a mechano-transducer in the endothelial cell where it contributes to stimulus-dependent hyperalgesia, and a model of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

PMID:
26497944
PMCID:
PMC4619430
DOI:
10.1186/s12990-015-0068-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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