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Am J Prev Med. 2016 Feb;50(2):161-70. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.07.032. Epub 2015 Oct 23.

Receipt of Preventive Services After Oregon's Randomized Medicaid Experiment.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Division of Biostatistics, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. Electronic address: marinom@ohsu.edu.
2
Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.
3
OCHIN, Inc., Portland, Oregon; Kaiser Permanente Northwest Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon.
4
OCHIN, Inc., Portland, Oregon.
5
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Division of Biostatistics, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.
6
Office of Health Analytics, Oregon Health Authority, Salem, Oregon.
7
Center for Health Systems Effectiveness, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.
8
Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; OCHIN, Inc., Portland, Oregon.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

It is predicted that gaining health insurance via the Affordable Care Act will result in increased rates of preventive health services receipt in the U.S., primarily based on self-reported findings from previous health insurance expansion studies. This study examined the long-term (36-month) impact of Oregon's 2008 randomized Medicaid expansion ("Oregon Experiment") on receipt of 12 preventive care services in community health centers using electronic health record data.

METHODS:

Demographic data from adult (aged 19-64 years) Oregon Experiment participants were probabilistically matched to electronic health record data from 49 Oregon community health centers within the OCHIN community health information network (N=10,643). Intent-to-treat analyses compared receipt of preventive services over a 36-month (2008-2011) period among those randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid versus not assigned, and instrumental variable analyses estimated the effect of actually gaining Medicaid coverage on preventive services receipt (data collected in 2012-2014; analysis performed in 2014-2015).

RESULTS:

Intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant differences between patients randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid (versus not assigned) for 8 of 12 assessed preventive services. In intent-to-treat analyses, Medicaid coverage significantly increased the odds of receipt of most preventive services (ORs ranging from 1.04 [95% CI=1.02, 1.06] for smoking assessment to 1.27 [95% CI=1.02, 1.57] for mammography).

CONCLUSIONS:

Rates of preventive services receipt will likely increase as community health center patients gain insurance through Affordable Care Act expansions. Continued effort is needed to increase health insurance coverage in an effort to decrease health disparities in vulnerable populations.

PMID:
26497264
PMCID:
PMC4718854
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2015.07.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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