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Cell. 2015 Oct 22;163(3):684-97. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.09.036. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Gene-specific translation regulation mediated by the hormone-signaling molecule EIN2.

Author information

1
Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA; IHSM-UMA-CSIC, Departamento de Biología Molecular y Bioquímica, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain.
2
Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA.
3
Department of Computer Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA.
4
Department of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA.
5
Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA; Genetics Graduate Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA. Electronic address: atstepan@ncsu.edu.
6
Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA; Genetics Graduate Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA. Electronic address: jmalonso@ncsu.edu.

Abstract

The central role of translation in modulating gene activity has long been recognized, yet the systematic exploration of quantitative changes in translation at a genome-wide scale in response to a specific stimulus has only recently become technically feasible. Using the well-characterized signaling pathway of the phytohormone ethylene and plant-optimized genome-wide ribosome footprinting, we have uncovered a molecular mechanism linking this hormone's perception to the activation of a gene-specific translational control mechanism. Characterization of one of the targets of this translation regulatory machinery, the ethylene signaling component EBF2, indicates that the signaling molecule EIN2 and the nonsense-mediated decay proteins UPFs play a central role in this ethylene-induced translational response. Furthermore, the 3'UTR of EBF2 is sufficient to confer translational regulation and required for the proper activation of ethylene responses. These findings represent a mechanistic paradigm of gene-specific regulation of translation in response to a key growth regulator.

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PMID:
26496608
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.09.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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