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Nat Commun. 2015 Oct 23;6:8715. doi: 10.1038/ncomms9715.

Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids.

Author information

1
Division of Renal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard Institutes of Medicine Suite 550, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
2
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, 850 Republican Street, Room S565, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA.
3
Kidney Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359606, Seattle, Washington 98104, USA.
4
Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA.
5
Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University, 7 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
6
Department of Biological Chemistry and Pharmacology, Boston Children's Hospital, Center for Life Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Room 3103, 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
7
Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard Institutes of Medicine Suite 823, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
8
Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
9
Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Sherman Fairchild Biochemistry Building 160, 7 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
10
The Biomedical Research Centre, University of British Columbia, 2222 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3.
11
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
12
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue DA517, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications.

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PMID:
26493500
PMCID:
PMC4620584
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms9715
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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