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Nat Commun. 2015 Oct 23;6:8694. doi: 10.1038/ncomms9694.

Microsecond-sustained lasing from colloidal quantum dot solids.

Author information

1
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G4.
2
Optoelectronic Materials Section, Department of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, Delft 2628 BL, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, 15213 Pennsylvania, USA.
4
Department of Material Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, 15213 Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

Colloidal quantum dots have grown in interest as materials for light amplification and lasing in view of their bright photoluminescence, convenient solution processing and size-controlled spectral tunability. To date, lasing in colloidal quantum dot solids has been limited to the nanosecond temporal regime, curtailing their application in systems that require more sustained emission. Here we find that the chief cause of nanosecond-only operation has been thermal runaway: the combination of rapid heat injection from the pump source, poor heat removal and a highly temperature-dependent threshold. We show microsecond-sustained lasing, achieved by placing ultra-compact colloidal quantum dot films on a thermally conductive substrate, the combination of which minimizes heat accumulation. Specifically, we employ inorganic-halide-capped quantum dots that exhibit high modal gain (1,200 cm(-1)) and an ultralow amplified spontaneous emission threshold (average peak power of ∼50 kW cm(-2)) and rely on an optical structure that dissipates heat while offering minimal modal loss.

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