Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell. 1989 Apr 21;57(2):233-42.

Disruption of the single tropomyosin gene in yeast results in the disappearance of actin cables from the cytoskeleton.

Author information

1
Section on Biochemistry Molecular, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853.

Abstract

The yeast tropomyosin gene, designated TPM1, is present in a single copy per haploid genome and encodes a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 23.5 kd. The protein sequence is homologous to higher cell tropomyosins, including the characteristic hydrophobic-hydrophilic pseudoheptapeptide repeats. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that tropomyosin is localized with actin cables in wild-type cells. Disruption of TPM1 is not lethal, but results in a reduced growth rate and disappearance of actin cables. Strains carrying the conditional actin mutation act1-2 also lack actin cables; overexpression of tropomyosin in these strains partially restores actin cables. These results strongly suggest that tropomyosin interacts with F actin in vivo and may play an important role in assembling or stabilizing actin cables in yeast.

PMID:
2649250
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center