Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2015 Oct 21;5:15460. doi: 10.1038/srep15460.

Aspirin might reduce the incidence of pancreatic cancer: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

Author information

1
Institute of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, Zhengzhou University, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, School of Medicine, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou 450052, P.R. China.
2
Department of Integrated Intensive Care Unit, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, School of Medicine, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou 450052, P.R. China.

Abstract

Although there is evidence that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might be able to prevent pancreatic cancer, the findings from epidemiological studies have been inconsistent. In this paper, we conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies to examine this possibility. We searched PubMed and Embase for observational (cohort or case-control) studies examining the consumption of aspirin and other NSAIDs and the incidence of or mortality rates associated with pancreatic cancer. Twelve studies including approximately 258,000 participants in total were analysed. The administration of aspirin significantly reduced the incidence of pancreatic cancer (8 studies; odds ratio (OR) = 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.62 to 0.96; I(2) = 74.2%) but not the mortality associated with it (2 studies; OR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.73 to 1.22). Specifically, frequent aspirin use was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer incidence (OR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.39 to 0.83 for high frequency; OR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.84 for medium frequency). The summary ORs regarding the incidence of pancreatic cancer and either non-aspirin NSAIDs use (OR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.31) or overall NSAIDs use (OR = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.86 to 1.10) were not significant. In conclusion, aspirin use might reduce the incidence of pancreatic cancer; however, this finding should be interpreted with caution because of study heterogeneity.

PMID:
26486090
PMCID:
PMC4614261
DOI:
10.1038/srep15460
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center