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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Nov 3;112(44):E5907-15. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1516410112. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

Genome sequence of the Asian Tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, reveals insights into its biology, genetics, and evolution.

Author information

1
Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China; 18664867266@qq.com fangxd@genomics.cn aajames@uci.edu.
2
Beijing Genomics Institute-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China;
3
Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China;
4
Program in Public Health, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697; Department of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy;
5
Laboratory of Agrozoology, Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium;
6
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, 73100 Heraklion, Greece; Faculty of Crop Science, Pesticide Science Lab, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens, Greece;
7
Department of Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057;
8
Department of Biology, University of Crete, Heraklion, GR-74100, Crete, Greece;
9
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, 73100 Heraklion, Greece;
10
Department of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy; Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, 1090 GE Amsterdam, The Netherlands;
11
Interdisciplinary PhD Program in Genetics, Bioinformatics, and Computational Biology, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA 24061; Department of Biochemistry, Fralin Life Science Institute, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA 24061;
12
Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060;
13
Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523;
14
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland; Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland; Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139; The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142;
15
Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China; Program in Public Health, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697;
16
Beijing Genomics Institute-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China; 18664867266@qq.com fangxd@genomics.cn aajames@uci.edu.
17
Departments of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics and Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 18664867266@qq.com fangxd@genomics.cn aajames@uci.edu.

Abstract

The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly successful invasive species that transmits a number of human viral diseases, including dengue and Chikungunya fevers. This species has a large genome with significant population-based size variation. The complete genome sequence was determined for the Foshan strain, an established laboratory colony derived from wild mosquitoes from southeastern China, a region within the historical range of the origin of the species. The genome comprises 1,967 Mb, the largest mosquito genome sequenced to date, and its size results principally from an abundance of repetitive DNA classes. In addition, expansions of the numbers of members in gene families involved in insecticide-resistance mechanisms, diapause, sex determination, immunity, and olfaction also contribute to the larger size. Portions of integrated flavivirus-like genomes support a shared evolutionary history of association of these viruses with their vector. The large genome repertory may contribute to the adaptability and success of Ae. albopictus as an invasive species.

KEYWORDS:

diapause; flavivirus; insecticide resistance; mosquito genome; transposons

PMID:
26483478
PMCID:
PMC4640774
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1516410112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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