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Trends Plant Sci. 2016 Jan;21(1):16-30. doi: 10.1016/j.tplants.2015.08.014. Epub 2015 Oct 5.

CO2 Sensing and CO2 Regulation of Stomatal Conductance: Advances and Open Questions.

Author information

1
Division of Biological Sciences, Cell and Developmental Biology Section and Center for Food & Fuel for the 21st Century, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0116, USA.
2
Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan.
3
Umeå Plant Science Center, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
4
Division of Biological Sciences, Cell and Developmental Biology Section and Center for Food & Fuel for the 21st Century, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0116, USA. Electronic address: jischroeder@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

Guard cells form epidermal stomatal gas-exchange valves in plants and regulate the aperture of stomatal pores in response to changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ([CO2]) in leaves. Moreover, the development of stomata is repressed by elevated CO2 in diverse plant species. Evidence suggests that plants can sense [CO2] changes via guard cells and via mesophyll tissues in mediating stomatal movements. We review new discoveries and open questions on mechanisms mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements and CO2 modulation of stomatal development, which together function in the CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance and gas exchange in plants. Research in this area is timely in light of the necessity of selecting and developing crop cultivars that perform better in a shifting climate.

KEYWORDS:

agriculture; atmospheric carbon dioxide; climate; guard cell signaling; stomatal development; stomatal movements

PMID:
26482956
PMCID:
PMC4707055
DOI:
10.1016/j.tplants.2015.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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