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Pediatrics. 2015 Nov;136(5):e1294-301. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-0874. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

Maternal Gestational and Postdelivery Weight Gain and Child Weight.

Author information

1
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; l.vanrossem@umcutrecht.nl.
2
Center for Prevention and Health Services Research, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands;
3
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands; and.
4
Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Pediatric Allergology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
5
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands;

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) is a risk factor for the development of overweight in her child. It is unknown whether GWG programs the child's health or whether GWG indicates a shared familial lifestyle during childhood. To disentangle these influences, we studied the association of GWG and postdelivery maternal weight change simultaneously with child's weight development.

METHODS:

We used data from 3367 children participating in a birth cohort that started in 1996 in the Netherlands. Weight and height were self-reported. GWG was categorized as "inadequate," "adequate," and "excessive." Multivariable regression and mixed models were used to study maternal and child weight changes.

RESULTS:

Children of mothers with excessive GWG had a higher BMI z score and overweight prevalence (odds ratio [OR] 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99 to 1.46) throughout childhood. Children of mothers with a high (≥1 kg/year) postdelivery weight gain had a 0.14 (95% CI, -0.08 to 0.36) higher change in BMI z score between age 1 and 14 years than children of mothers with a low (<0.5 kg/year) postdelivery weight gain. Children of mothers with excessive GWG in combination with a high postdelivery weight gain had the highest BMI z score and overweight risk at age 14 years (OR 3.53; 95% CI, 1.70 to 7.33).

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal GWG and postdelivery weight gain contribute to child's weight development up to adolescence independently.

PMID:
26482665
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2015-0874
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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