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Int J Infect Dis. 2015 Dec;41:11-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2015.10.005. Epub 2015 Oct 23.

Seroprevalence of arboviruses among blood donors in French Polynesia, 2011-2013.

Author information

1
Unit of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institut Louis Malardé, PO Box 30, 98713 Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia. Electronic address: maubry@ilm.pf.
2
Hochschule Emden/Leer, Emden, Germany.
3
Unit of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institut Louis Malardé, PO Box 30, 98713 Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia.
4
Centre de Transfusion Sanguine de la Polynésie Française, Hôpital du Taaone, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia.
5
Unité Hépacivirus et Immunité Innée, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
6
Unité Hépacivirus et Immunité Innée, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France; UMR PIMIT (12T) Université de La Réunion, Sainte-Clotilde, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

French Polynesia is a high epidemic/endemic area for arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses). We recently reported the silent circulation of Ross River virus and absence of active transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) among blood donors sampled before the emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) and CHIKV in French Polynesia. In this study, the prevalence of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) and the occurrence of circulation of other arboviruses were investigated in blood donors in French Polynesia.

METHODS:

Serum samples from 593 blood donors collected between July 2011 and October 2013 were tested by ELISA for the presence of immunoglobulin G antibodies against each of the four DENV serotypes, ZIKV, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and West Nile virus (WNV).

RESULTS:

It was found that 80.3%, 0.8%, 1.3%, and 1.5% of blood donors were seropositive for at least one DENV serotype, ZIKV, JEV, and WNV, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results corroborate the expected high transmission of DENV and conversely suggest that no active circulation of ZIKV, JEV, and WNV occurred in French Polynesia before 2011. Information provided by this study may be useful for public health authorities to improve surveillance and implement strategies to prevent the transmission of arboviruses.

KEYWORDS:

Arboviruses; Blood donors; Dengue; French Polynesia; Pacific; Seroprevalence

PMID:
26482390
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2015.10.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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