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Diabet Med. 2016 Jun;33(6):820-6. doi: 10.1111/dme.12997. Epub 2015 Nov 14.

Financial costs for families of children with Type 1 diabetes in lower-income countries.

Author information

1
International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child Program, Glebe, Sydney, Australia.
2
Diabetes NSW, Glebe, Sydney, Australia.
3
NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
4
Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia.
5
Insulin for Life Australia and Global, Caulfield, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess the direct costs of necessary consumables for minimal care of a child with Type 1 diabetes in countries where the public health system does not regularly provide such care.

METHODS:

Supply costs were collected between January 2013 and February 2015 from questionnaires submitted by centres requesting International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child Program support. All 20 centres in 15 countries agreed to the use of their responses. Annual costs for minimal care were estimated for: 18 × 10 ml 100 IU/ml insulin, 1/3 cost of a blood glucose meter, two blood glucose test strips/day, two syringes/week, and four HbA1c tests/year. Costs were expressed in US dollars, and as % of gross national income (purchasing power parity) per capita.

RESULTS:

The ranges (median) for the minimum supply costs through the private system were: insulin 10 ml 100 IU/ml equivalent vial: $5.10-$25 ($8.00); blood glucose meter: $15-$121 ($33.33); test strip: $0.15-$1.20 ($0.50); syringe: $0.10-$0.56 ($0.20); and HbA1c : $4.90-$20 ($9.75). Annual costs ranged from $255 (Pakistan) to $1,185 (Burkina Faso), with a median of $553. Annual % gross national income costs were 12-370% (median 56%). For the lowest 20% income earners the annual cost ranged 20-1535% (median 153%). St Lucia and Mongolia were the only countries whose governments consistently provided insulin. No government provided meters and strips, which were the most expensive supplies (62% of total cost).

CONCLUSIONS:

In less-resourced countries, even minimal care is beyond many families' means. In addition, families face additional costs such as consultations, travel and indirect costs. Action to prevent diabetes-related death and morbidity is needed.

PMID:
26482333
DOI:
10.1111/dme.12997
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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