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Dig Endosc. 2016 Mar;28(2):145-51. doi: 10.1111/den.12559. Epub 2015 Nov 9.

Feasibility of deep sedation with a combination of propofol and dexmedetomidine hydrochloride for esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.
2
Office of Postgraduate Medical Education, Yokohama City University Hospital, Yokohama, Japan.
3
Department of Anesthesiology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sedation with a combination of propofol (PF) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) compared with sedation with benzodiazepines in esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD).

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed clinical data for 40 consecutive patients who had undergone esophageal ESD at the Yokohama City University Hospital between July 2012 and August 2014. Of these patients, 20 were sedated with benzodiazepines (conventional group) and another 20 patients were sedated with a combination of PF and DEX (combination group). Parameters for efficacy and safety of sedation were evaluated by comparisons between the two groups.

RESULTS:

Median procedural times in the combination group were shorter than those in the conventional group (61 min vs. 89 min, P = 0.03), and the percentage of patients who showed restlessness in the combination group was significantly lower than that in the conventional group (25% vs. 65%, P = 0.025). Incidences of hypotension and bradycardia in the combination group were higher than those in the conventional group (60% vs. 15%, P = 0.008, and 60% vs. 15%, P = 0.008, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

This retrospective study suggests that a combination of PF and DEX may provide stable deep sedation with less body movement than benzodiazepines during esophageal ESD.

KEYWORDS:

benzodiazepine; dexmedetomidine; endoscopic submucosal dissection; esophagus; propofol

PMID:
26476104
DOI:
10.1111/den.12559
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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