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Obes Surg. 2016 Jun;26(6):1296-302. doi: 10.1007/s11695-015-1944-8.

Taste and Olfactory Changes Following Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

Author information

1
The Obesity Clinic at "Hospital General Tláhuac", Avenida La Turba #655, Col. Villa Centroamericana y del Caribe, Del. Tláhuac, 13278, Mexico City, Mexico. zerrweck@yahoo.com.
2
The Obesity Clinic at "Hospital General Dr. Rubén Leñero", Mexico City, Mexico.
3
The Obesity Clinic at "Hospital General Tláhuac", Avenida La Turba #655, Col. Villa Centroamericana y del Caribe, Del. Tláhuac, 13278, Mexico City, Mexico.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Alterations in taste/smell after bariatric surgery have been observed, but few data is available. Some authors documented these changes and their role on weight loss but there is no evidence after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG).

METHODS:

Cohort study with patients submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGBP) and LSG that were asked to participate in a validated survey. The primary objective was to determinate the differences between procedures for taste and smell changes; a demographic and anthropometric analysis were also performed. Secondarily, the relation between food aversion and weight loss was also obtained.

RESULTS:

Final analysis was based on 154 patients (104 LGBP and 50 LSG). The overall mean time between surgery and questionnaire was 10 ± 6.7 months. Most of the patients (87.6 %) experienced some taste/smell change. There were no differences between procedures for any change, taste or smell change. More patients submitted to LGBP referred that food smelled different (51.9 vs 34 % for the LSG group; p = 0.040). Higher %EWL was observed for patients presenting food aversion (73.3 ± 19.7 vs 65.8 ± 19.4 % for those without aversion; p = 0.046). Based on type of surgery, the LGBP group had the same trend (%EWL of 78.2 ± 17.3 vs 70.4 ± 18.6 % for those without aversion; p = 0.044).

CONCLUSION:

The majority of patients presented taste and olfactory changes soon after surgery independently of type of procedure. Patients submitted to LGBP referred more often a different smell in food. Higher %EWL was observed in patients presenting any food aversion, especially in the LGBP group.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric surgery; Laparoscopic gastric bypass; Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy; Obesity; Olfactory; Smell; Taste

PMID:
26475030
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-015-1944-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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