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Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med. 2015 Dec;17(12):59. doi: 10.1007/s11936-015-0417-7.

Mobile Health Initiatives to Improve Outcomes in Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

Author information

1
Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Carnegie 568, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. burrea1@jhmi.edu.
2
Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Carnegie 592, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. smisra5@jhmi.edu.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2024 E Monument St, Suite 2-617, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. tplante1@jhmi.edu.
4
Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Rd NE, Suite #513, Atlanta, GA, 30329, USA. hkelli@emory.edu.
5
Stanford Health Care, 300 Pasteur Dr, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. sanjit.misra@gmail.com.
6
Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Blalock 524, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. mblaha1@jhmi.edu.
7
Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Carnegie 591, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. smart100@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease affects more than a third of American adults and is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. Over the last 40 years, several behavioral and medical risk factors have been recognized as major contributors to cardiovascular disease. Effective management of many of these risk factors, particularly behavioral risk factors, remains challenging. With the growth of mobile health (mHealth) technology, a variety of novel strategies are now available to facilitate the delivery of interventions directed at reducing these risk factors. In this review, we discuss recent clinical studies and technologic innovations leveraging smartphone devices, social media, and wearable health tracking devices to facilitate behavioral interventions directed at three important and highly prevalent behavioral risk factors for cardiovascular disease: smoking, physical inactivity, and sub-optimal nutrition. We believe this technology has significant potential to provide low-cost, scalable, and individualized tools to improve management of these important cardiovascular disease risk factors.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Mobile health technology; Prevention; Risk factors

PMID:
26474892
DOI:
10.1007/s11936-015-0417-7

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