Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nanomedicine. 2016 Jan;12(1):69-79. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2015.09.010. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

3D printed nanocomposite matrix for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.
2
Department of Oncology, and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
3
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; Department of Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: lgzhang@gwu.edu.

Abstract

Bone is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, in part due to an absence of advanced platforms for cancer culture and study that mimic the bone microenvironment. In the present study, we integrated a novel stereolithography-based 3D printer and a unique 3D printed nano-ink consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspended in hydrogel to create a biomimetic bone-specific environment for evaluating breast cancer bone invasion. Breast cancer cells cultured in a geometrically optimized matrix exhibited spheroid morphology and migratory characteristics. Co-culture of tumor cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells increased the formation of spheroid clusters. The 3D matrix also allowed for higher drug resistance of breast cancer cells than 2D culture. These results validate that our 3D bone matrix can mimic tumor bone microenvironments, suggesting that it can serve as a tool for studying metastasis and assessing drug sensitivity. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer remains a major cause of mortality for patients in the clinical setting. For breast cancer, bone is one of the most common metastatic sites. In this intriguing article, the authors developed a bone-like environment using 3D printing technology to investigate the underlying biology of bone metastasis. Their results would also allow a new model for other researchers who work on cancer to use.

KEYWORDS:

3D printing; Bone cancer metastasis; Breast cancer; Nanomaterial

PMID:
26472048
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2015.09.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center