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J Neurosci. 2015 Oct 14;35(41):13912-6. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2654-15.2015.

Time in Cortical Circuits.

Author information

1
Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom, gerald.finnerty@kcl.ac.uk.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032.
3
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Massachusetts 02139.
4
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3UD, United Kingdom, and.
5
Department of Neurobiology and Department of Psychology, Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095.

Abstract

Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. This neural activity is linked to cognition that operates in the present or anticipates events or stimuli in the near future. We focus on deliberation and planning in the context of decision making as a cognitive process that integrates information across time. We progress to consider how temporal expectations of the future modulate perception. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition.

SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT:

Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition.

PMID:
26468192
PMCID:
PMC4604229
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2654-15.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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