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J Anat. 2015 Nov;227(5):665-72. doi: 10.1111/joa.12370. Epub 2015 Sep 10.

In vivo relationship between pelvis motion and deep fascia displacement of the medial gastrocnemius: anatomical and functional implications.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
2
Laboratory of Biomechanics, San José Hospital, Santiago, Chile.
3
Chiropractic Programme, Health Faculty, Central University, Santiago, Chile.
4
SCIAN-Lab, Programme of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Faculty of Medicine, ICBM, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
5
Departamento de Ciencias Morfológicas, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad San Sebastián, Santiago, Chile.
6
Departamento de Fisioterapia, Andalucía Tech, Cátedra de Fisioterapia y Discapacidad, Instituto de Investigacion Biomedica de Malaga (IBIMA), Clinemtria (F-14), Universidad de Malaga, Málaga, Spain.
7
School of Clinical Science, Faculty of Health at Queensland University Technology, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.

Abstract

Different authors have modelled myofascial tissue connectivity over a distance using cadaveric models, but in vivo models are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pelvic motion and deep fascia displacement in the medial gastrocnemius (MG). Deep fascia displacement of the MG was evaluated through automatic tracking with an ultrasound. Angular variation of the pelvis was determined by 2D kinematic analysis. The average maximum fascia displacement and pelvic motion were 1.501 ± 0.78 mm and 6.55 ± 2.47 °, respectively. The result of a simple linear regression between fascia displacement and pelvic motion for three task executions by 17 individuals was r = 0.791 (P < 0.001). Moreover, hamstring flexibility was related to a lower anterior tilt of the pelvis (r = 0.544, P < 0.024) and a lower deep fascia displacement of the MG (r = 0.449, P < 0.042). These results support the concept of myofascial tissue connectivity over a distance in an in vivo model, reinforce the functional concept of force transmission through synergistic muscle groups, and grant new perspectives for the role of fasciae in restricting movement in remote zones.

KEYWORDS:

fascia; musculoskeletal; tracking motion; ultrasound

PMID:
26467242
PMCID:
PMC4609201
DOI:
10.1111/joa.12370
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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