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Eur J Nutr. 2016 Dec;55(8):2493-2498. Epub 2015 Oct 14.

Glycaemic responses to liquid food supplements among three Asian ethnic groups.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, A*STAR, 14 Medical Drive, #07-02, Singapore, 117599, Singapore. siewling_tey@sics.a-star.edu.sg.
2
Nutricia Research, Uppsalalaan 12, 3584 CT, Utrecht, Netherlands.
3
NUTRIM, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Faculty of Health, Medicine, and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 40, 6229 ER, Maastricht, Netherlands.
4
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, A*STAR, 14 Medical Drive, #07-02, Singapore, 117599, Singapore.
5
Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore, 117596, Singapore.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

A limited number of studies have compared the glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic responses (GR) to solid foods between Caucasians and Asians. These studies have demonstrated that Asians have greater GI and GR values for solid foods than Caucasians. However, no study has compared the GI and GR to liquids among various Asian ethnic groups.

METHODS:

A total of forty-eight males and females (16 Chinese, 16 Indians, and 16 Malay) took part in this randomised, crossover study. Glycaemic response to the reference food (glucose beverage) was measured on three occasions, and GR to three liquids were measured on one occasion each. Liquids with different macronutrient ratio's and carbohydrate types were chosen to be able to evaluate the response to products with different GIs. Blood glucose concentrations were measured in duplicate at baseline (-5 and 0 min) and once at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the commencement of beverage consumption.

RESULTS:

There were statistically significant differences in GI and GR between the three liquids (P < 0.01 in all cases). However, there were no statistically significant differences in GI and GR for the liquids between the ethnic groups (Chinese vs. Indian vs. Malay).

CONCLUSION:

The GR for three different types of liquid nutritional supplements did not differ between the three main ethnic groups in Asia. It appears that the GI of liquid food derived from one Asian ethnicity can be applicable to other Asian populations.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese; Glycaemic index; Glycaemic response; Indian; Liquid; Malay

PMID:
26467048
PMCID:
PMC5122616
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-015-1072-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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