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Pancreas. 2015 Nov;44(8):1185-94. doi: 10.1097/MPA.0000000000000552.

Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Bioengineering, and Related Technologies for the Development of Biomarkers of Pancreatic Disease: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Workshop.

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1
From the *Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; †Eppley Cancer Institute, University of Nebraska School of Medicine, Omaha, NE; ‡Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Departments of Medicine and Anesthesiology and Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA; §Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research and the Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; ∥Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; ¶Cancer Biomarkers Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; and #Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Abstract

A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering focused on research gaps and opportunities in the development of new biomarkers of pancreatic disease. The session was held on July 22, 2015, and structured into 6 sessions: 1) Introduction and Overview; 2) Keynote Address; 3) New Approaches to the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis; 4) Biomarkers of Pain and Inflammation; 5) New Approaches to the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer; and 6) Shed Exosomes, Shed Cells, and Shed Proteins. Recent advances in the fields of pancreatic imaging, functional markers of pancreatic disease, proteomics, molecular and cellular imaging, and detection of circulating cancer cells and exosomes were reviewed. Knowledge gaps and research needs were highlighted. The development of new methods for the noninvasive determination of pancreatic pathology; the use of cellular markers of pancreatic function, inflammation, pain, and malignancy; and the refinement of methods to identify cells and cellular constituents of pancreatic cancer were discussed. The further refinement of sophisticated technical methods and the need for clinical studies to validate these new approaches in large-scale studies of patients at risk for the development of pancreatic disease were repeatedly emphasized.

PMID:
26465948
PMCID:
PMC4608388
DOI:
10.1097/MPA.0000000000000552
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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