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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2015 Nov;39(11):2234-48. doi: 10.1111/acer.12886. Epub 2015 Oct 14.

Personality and substance use: psychometric evaluation and validation of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) in English, Irish, French, and German adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
2
Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
3
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM CEA Unit 1000 "Imaging & Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, Orsay, France.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Orsay Hospital, Orsay, France.
5
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
6
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience and Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
7
Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
8
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, CHU Ste Justine Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
10
Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
11
Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
12
Neurospin, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Paris, France.
13
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
14
Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
15
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont.
16
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
17
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
18
School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
19
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
20
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
21
Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
22
MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of the present longitudinal study was the psychometric evaluation of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS).

METHODS:

We analyzed data from N = 2,022 adolescents aged 13 to 15 at baseline assessment and 2 years later (mean interval 2.11 years). Missing data at follow-up were imputed (N = 522). Psychometric properties of the SURPS were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis. We examined structural as well as convergent validity with other personality measurements and drinking motives, and predictive validity for substance use at follow-up.

RESULTS:

The hypothesized 4-factorial structure (i.e., anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, impulsivity [IMP], and sensation seeking [SS]) based on all 23 items resulted in acceptable fit to empirical data, acceptable internal consistencies, low to moderate test-retest reliability coefficients, as well as evidence for factorial and convergent validity. The proposed factor structure was stable for both males and females and, to lesser degree, across languages. However, only the SS and the IMP subscales of the SURPS predicted substance use outcomes at 16 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS:

The SURPS is unique in its specific assessment of traits related to substance use disorders as well as the resulting shortened administration time. Test-retest reliability was low to moderate and comparable to other personality scales. However, its relation to future substance use was limited to the SS and IMP subscales, which may be due to the relatively low-risk substance use pattern in the present sample.

KEYWORDS:

Confirmatory Factor Analysis; Personality; Psychometrics; Substance Use

PMID:
26463560
DOI:
10.1111/acer.12886
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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