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PLoS One. 2015 Oct 13;10(10):e0139281. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0139281. eCollection 2015.

Viewpoints on Factors for Successful Employment for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Author information

1
School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
2
School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Education and Communication, CHILD programme, Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Jönköping County, Sweden.
3
School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Science (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Östergötland County, Sweden.

Abstract

This article explores the key factors for successful employment from the viewpoints of adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and employers. Two groups of individuals participated in this study, 40 adults with ASD and 35 employers. Q method was used to understand and contrast the viewpoints of the two groups. Data were analysed using by-person varimax rotation factor analysis. Results showed that although both groups appear committed to the employment process, the difference in their understanding regarding the type of workplace support required, job expectations and productivity requirements continues to hinder successful employment. These results highlight the need to facilitate communication between employees and employers to ensure a clear understanding of the needs of both groups are met. The use of an ASD-specific workplace tool may assist in facilitating the necessary communication between these two groups.

PMID:
26462234
PMCID:
PMC4603894
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0139281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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