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Biochemistry. 2015 Nov 10;54(44):6673-83. doi: 10.1021/acs.biochem.5b00975. Epub 2015 Nov 2.

G protein-coupled receptors directly bind filamin A with high affinity and promote filamin phosphorylation.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic , Cleveland, Ohio 44195, United States.

Abstract

Although interaction of a few G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with Filamin A, a key actin cross-linking and biomechanical signal transducer protein, has been observed, a comprehensive structure-function analysis of this interaction is lacking. Through a systematic sequence-based analysis, we found that a conserved filamin binding motif is present in the cytoplasmic domains of >20% of the 824 GPCRs encoded in the human genome. Direct high-affinity interaction of filamin binding motif peptides of select GPCRs with the Ig domain of Filamin A was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetric experiments. Engagement of the filamin binding motif with the Filamin A Ig domain induced the phosphorylation of filamin by protein kinase A in vitro. In transfected cells, agonist activation as well as constitutive activation of representative GPCRs dramatically elicited recruitment and phosphorylation of cellular Filamin A, a phenomenon long known to be crucial for regulating the structure and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. Our data suggest a molecular mechanism for direct GPCR-cytoskeleton coupling via filamin. Until now, GPCR signaling to the cytoskeleton was predominantly thought to be indirect, through canonical G protein-mediated signaling cascades involving GTPases, adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases, ion channels, and protein kinases. We propose that the GPCR-induced filamin phosphorylation pathway is a conserved, novel biochemical signaling paradigm.

PMID:
26460884
PMCID:
PMC4642222
DOI:
10.1021/acs.biochem.5b00975
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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