Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2015 Nov 20;467(3):541-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.09.159. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

Probiotic-derived polyphosphate improves the intestinal barrier function through the caveolin-dependent endocytic pathway.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Japan.
2
Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Japan. Electronic address: fjym@asahikawa-med.ac.jp.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, International Health and Science University Hospital, Japan.
4
Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Japan; Department of Gastroenterology, International Health and Science University Hospital, Japan.

Abstract

Probiotics exhibit beneficial functions for host homeostasis maintenance. We herein investigated the mechanism by which Lactobacillus brevis-derived poly P exhibited a beneficial function. Immunostaining indicated that poly P was captured in the plasma membrane via integrin β1 in Caco2/bbe cells. The uptake of poly P was reduced by the inhibition of integrin β1 as well as caveolin-1, a major component of lipid rafts. The function of poly P, including the induction of HSP27 and enhancement of the intestinal barrier function, was suppressed by the inhibition of caveolin-1, illustrating that the function of poly P was mediated by the endocytic pathway. High-throughput sequencing revealed that poly P induced tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3, which contributes to cytoprotection, including upregulation of the intestinal barrier function. The present study demonstrates a novel host-probiotic interaction through the uptake of bacterial substance into host cells, which is distinct from pattern recognition receptor pathways.

KEYWORDS:

Host-probiotic interaction; Polyphosphate; Probiotics

PMID:
26459590
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.09.159
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center