Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Dent Res. 2016 Feb;95(2):180-7. doi: 10.1177/0022034515611047. Epub 2015 Oct 12.

Distinct Excitation to Pulpal Stimuli between Somatosensory and Insular Cortices.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan Division of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Research, Dental Research Center, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan Division of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Research, Dental Research Center, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Department of Pharmacology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan Division of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Research, Dental Research Center, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan Molecular Imaging Research Center, RIKEN, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Japan kobayashi.masayuki@nihon-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Somatosensory information from the dental pulp is processed in the primary (S1) and secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) and in the insular oral region (IOR). Stimulation of maxillary incisor and molar initially induces excitation in S2/IOR, rostrodorsal to the mandibular incisor and molar pulp-responding regions. Although S1 and S2/IOR play their own roles in nociceptive information processing, the anatomical and physiological differences in the temporal activation kinetics, dependency on stimulation intensity, and additive or summative effects of simultaneous pulpal stimulation are still unknown. This information contributes not only to understanding topographical organization but also to speculating about the roles of S1 and S2/IOR in clinical aspects of pain regulation. In vivo optical imaging enables investigation of the spatiotemporal profiles of cortical excitation with high resolution. We determined the distinct features of optical responses to nociceptive stimulation of dental pulps between S1 and S2/IOR. In comparison to S1, optical signals in S2/IOR showed a larger amplitude with a shorter rise time and a longer decay time responding to maxillary molar pulp stimulation. The latency of excitation in S2/IOR was shorter than in S1. S2/IOR exhibited a lower threshold to evoke optical responses than S1, and the peak amplitude was larger in S2/IOR than in S1. Unexpectedly, the topography of S1 that responded to maxillary and mandibular incisor and molar pulps overlapped with the most ventral sites in S1 that was densely stained with cytochrome oxidase. An additive effect was observed in both S1 and S2/IOR after simultaneous stimulation of bilateral maxillary molar pulps but not after contralateral maxillary and mandibular molar pulp stimulation. These findings suggest that S2/IOR is more sensitive for detecting dental pulp sensation and codes stimulation intensity more precisely than S1. In addition, contra- and ipsilateral dental pulp nociception converges onto spatially closed sites in S1 and S2/IOR.

KEYWORDS:

nociception; optical imaging; pain; somatotopy; stimulation intensity; tooth pulp

PMID:
26459554
DOI:
10.1177/0022034515611047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center